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A message from the President and Board Chair

2021 began much like 2020 ended, as Mercy Housing continued to navigate a global pandemic. Despite the many unknowns and challenges of COVID-19, 2021 was a year where we worked together and made good progress toward our strategic goals. The strength and resilience of residents and staff to move forward, adapt, and be there for one another was inspirational. We are more determined than ever to expand our vision for a better future — where everyone has a stable, affordable home, and a place to pursue their dreams.

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Lending a Hand During the Pandemic

 

We’ve known that Mercy Housing onsite staff were essential frontline workers before it became a household term during the pandemic. They always will be essential to our mission. But what they accomplished in 2020 was nothing short of a miracle. The country was dealing with so much, and the impact of the pandemic was hitting people with low incomes the hardest. Practically overnight, staff became experts in CDC regulations and transformed the way we work and deliver essential services to residents in need. Employees’ innovation and can-do attitude coupled with close community relationships made the impossible, possible.

 

By the Numbers

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Mercy Housing Communities

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Mercy Community Capital

New Development

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Regional Office

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National Headquarters

THE AVERAGE RESIDENT INCOME IS

$13,027

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which is less than 1/5 of the national average, $67,521

6.5
Years

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AVERAGE LENGTH OF RESIDENCY

WHO WE SERVE

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328

PROPERTIES

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23,903

APARTMENT HOMES

42,447

RESIDENTS

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65%
 
26
%

9%

Families

Seniors

Special Needs

RACIAL AND ETHNIC DIVERSITY

To ensure equitable and inclusive communities, our employees demographics align with the residents we serve:

27%

Black or African American

11%

Asian

1%

American Indian/Native

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23%

Hispanic or Latino

1%

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

38%

White

 
Development Highlights
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Mercy Housing is committed to developing affordable, program-enriched housing for low-income families, seniors, veterans, and people with disabilities who lack the economic resources to access quality, stable housing.

 

In 2021, we opened eight new communities and refurbished three existing buildings. Regardless of the scale and population served, each Mercy Housing community is built with an unwavering commitment to dynamic partnerships, creative vision, and extensive community planning. 

Investing in
Our Future
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Supporting Mercy Housing’s youngest residents is something we strive to achieve. We believe that kids need support to succeed in school and in life, which is why we provide Out-of-School Time programs to Mercy Housing youth. These programs offer kids a place to go when their parents are at work or if they need help with homework. And thanks to community partners, including the Dominican Sisters of Adrian and Arik Armstead, we have been able to grow our out-of-school time programs. 

Innovations in Development

We are continually seeking ways to reduce the time and cost it takes to build affordable housing. Tahanan, which features 146 micro-studios for people exiting homelessness, was the first Mercy Housing community built using modular construction.

Located in San Francisco’s South of Market Area, this permanent supportive housing community, which completed construction in 2021, for adults who have experienced homelessness features 145 studio apartments.

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2021 Highlights

 

Henry’s life has been full of both struggle and triumph. He overcame a challenging childhood to attend a prestigious college and later worked for years in social services. However, Henry also struggled with addiction, harming his career and relationships with his family. He decided it was time to take control of his life and checked himself into a recovery program, ultimately leading to his current home at South Loop Apartments in Chiacgo, where he has lived for 14 years.

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When Health and Housing Combine, Good Things Happen